Cattle Area Kweneng Distric – Botswana

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Economic Areas Category: LIVESTOCK AREASEconomic Areas Tags: Beef

  • Profile

    Tswana is an indigenous beef cattle breed of Botswana. It is a Sanga type, similar to Barotse and Tuli. Its colour is plain black or multi coloured: usually red pied, and rarely black pied. The breed can also be found in South Africa. Animals of this breed are well adapted to hot, dry environments and have a high level of tick and heat tolerance. Other common local names are: Bechuana, Sechuana, Setswana, Batawana, Mangwato, Sengologa, and Seshaga.

    Kweneng is one of the districts of Botswana and is the recent historical homeland of the Bakwena people, the first group in Botswana converted to Christianity by famed missionary David Livingstone. Various landmarks, including Livingstone’s Cave, allude to this history. The seat of the district’s government is Molepolole, Botswana’s most populous village (only trailing Botswana’s two cities: Gaborone and Francistown).

    It borders Central District in northeast, Kgatleng District on the east, South-East District in southeast, Southern District in south, Kgalagadi District in the west, Ghanzi District in the north. The district is administered by a district administration and district council which are responsible for local administration. Manyana rock paintings in Manyana village and Kgosi Sechele I Museum are the major attractions in the district.

    As of 2011, the total population of the district was 304,549 compared to 230,335 in 2001. The growth rate of population during the decade was 2.83. As of 2006, the total number of people working in Kweneng East in agricultural sector was 7,212, 4,727 male and 2,484 female, with agriculture being the major profession.

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